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Risk Management>>

December 2012

Avoiding Tainted, Unapproved, and Counterfeit Medication Risks

As a result of the recent outbreak of fungal meningitis cases, practitioners and patients across the nation have become aware of the risks inherent in purchasing drugs from vendors who are potentially unsafe.  This meningitis outbreak has required significant time and effort on the part of physicians, facilities, and their staff members in tracking and treating the patients who were, or potentially could be, affected by these drugs.  The purpose of this article is to address concerns about purchasing drugs from ‘unregulated’ sources.

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Risk Management>>

November 2012

Update: A Proactive Approach to Addressing Patient Safety Risks Associated with the 2012 Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

Content Updated November 7, 2012

The recent outbreak of fungal meningitis in the United States and subsequent recall of potentially contaminated medications have created concerns about patient safety and liability among a number of Princeton Insurance policyholders. This update includes information about ophthalmic drugs that are injectable or used in conjunction with eye surgery and cardioplegic solutions. It also contains a sample letter that can be used to notify patients.

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General Liability>>

November 2012

Unexpected Medical Record Damage:
protecting your records when water rushes in
Updated November 5, 2012

Accidents or unexpected disasters can result in extensive water damage to important documents such as medical records and X-ray films. In recent years, New Jersey has seen its share of flooding, including the most recent damage from Hurricane Sandy and subsequent storm surge. Broken water pipes or an overflowing floor drain can cause unexpected damage to stored medical records in a basement or storage room. Water damage can also be an unanticipated side effect of fire fighting efforts.
Read the full story » 

 

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Risk Management>>

October 2012

 


Update: A Proactive Approach to Addressing Patient Safety Risks

Associated With the 2012 Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

 

Content updated October 24, 2012


The recent outbreak of fungal meningitis in the United States and subsequent recall of potentially contaminated medications have created concerns about patient safety and liability among a number of Princeton Insurance policyholders. This update includes information about ophthalmic drugs that are injectable or used in conjunction with eye surgery and cardioplegic solutions. It also contains a sample letter that can be used to notify patients.

 

Read the full story »

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Risk Management>>

October 2012

 


A Proactive Approach to Addressing Patient Safety Risks

Associated With the 2012 Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

 

The recent outbreak of fungal meningitis in the United States and subsequent recall of a contaminated steroid medication have created concerns about patient safety and liability among a number of Princeton Insurance’s insureds.

 

Read the full story »

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Risk Management>>

October 2012


Use of Chaperones During Physical Exams

 

Using a chaperone during some patient examinations can be beneficial for both the patient and the provider. The New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners (BME) regulation, N.J.A.C. 13:35-6.23, addresses the use of chaperones in medical office settings. The regulation states that all patients, or other persons who are to be examined, should be notified of their right to a chaperone. This applies to examinations of the female breast and pelvic exams, and also to genitalia and rectal exams for both sexes.

 

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Risk Management>>

August 2012

 

Breaking Up is Hard to Do

Neil Sedaka may have said it best. Breaking up is hard to do. But breaking up isn’t just about teenage crushes, or failed marriages. Physician practices suffer unexpected breakups too, and physician departures from groups can represent risks to the practice in the form of financial loss, diminished reputation, possible claims of patient abandonment, and damage to internal practice processes. Ultimately, if your practice is thrown into disarray, even temporarily, patient safety and risk management can suffer and put you at risk for liability claims.

Read the full story here »


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Risk Management>>

August 2012

 

Managing Office Patients on Anticoagulants
Part two in a two-part series

 

In the first part, we discussed the importance of anticoagulation medication management and the prominent role it often plays in litigation. We listed some key components of an effective tracking system and how to manage the system with and without EHRs. In this article we will explore the types of orders and other scenarios that should be tracked and other risks to be mindful of when caring for patients who take anticoagulants.

Read the full story here »


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Claim Review
>>

July 2012

 

Anticoagulation Management - Claim Review

See related: Managing Office Patients on Anticoagulants
 

In this claim review, we observe what can happen when multiple healthcare providers are treating a patient who is taking anticoagulation medication and a breakdown in communication occurs among the physicians. Upon analysis, we examine steps that could have been taken to avoid the breakdown and ultimately better manage the patient’s treatment.

Read the full claim review here »

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Risk Management>>

July 2012

 

Managing Office Patients on Anticoagulants
Part one in a two-part series

 

US Pharmacist reports that Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have been the mainstay of oral anticoagulant therapy for more than 60 years, and Warfarin is the most common one in use today. VKAs are proven to be effective in the prevention and treatment of thrombosis, but they are by nature high-risk medications with narrow therapeutic targets. The goal of anticoagulation therapy is to administer the lowest effective dose in order to maintain the target international normalized ratio (INR). However, differences in drug metabolism among individuals, comorbidities, and the use of interacting medications can significantly influence the intensity of the anticoagulant effect and the risk of bleeding complications. If you treat adults in your practice there is a good chance that some of your patients may be on anticoagulants, whether you are the ordering physician or not...

Read the full story here »


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News

May 2012

 

Physician Office Practice Toolkit
Updated version now available

 

We are pleased to present an updated version of the Physician Office Practice Toolkit for 2012. Some information which was found in the previous toolkit has been revised, and new information has been added. The updates have been posted on the physician and hospital secure sites at PrincetonInsurance.com.

 

The toolkit, as before, includes sample forms and letters for physician practices to download and use. Some of these forms have been updated and several forms have been added.

 

You will also find ideas for policy and procedure development and simple fixes for the issues that are driving litigation, settlements and verdicts.

 

Our consultants remain available to you to provide further guidance, answer any questions you may have and perform office practice assessments to assist you in your risk management efforts. They can be reached via our toll-free Risk Resource Line – 1-866-Rx-4-Risk (866-794-7475).

 

To view a list of the new sections that have been added to the toolkit, click here.

 

To go directly to the toolkit, click here. (log in required)

 

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Risk Management>>

October 2012

 


A Proactive Approach to Addressing Patient Safety Risks

Associated With the 2012 Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

 

The recent outbreak of fungal meningitis in the United States and subsequent recall of a contaminated steroid medication have created concerns about patient safety and liability among a number of Princeton Insurance’s insureds.

 

Read the full story »

Risk Management>>

February 2012

 

Risk Management Considerations for Joint Protocols
Between Advance Practice Nurses and Collaborating Physicians

 

The use of Advance Practice Nurses (APNs) in the physician office setting can greatly enhance patient access to care, practice productivity, and provide a cost effective means of delivering quality healthcare. APNs are trained to take in-depth histories and physical exams, perform certain procedures and may have prescriptive authority. However, New Jersey, like many other states, requires APNs who seek to prescribe or order medications or devices to have a joint protocol or collaborative agreement with a physician...

 

Read the full story here »

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General Liability>>

February 2012

 

Avoiding Slips, Trips & Falls
at Your Practice

 

Most healthcare providers are aware of common slip-and-trip hazards. However, familiarity with your environment may have allowed you to adjust, making it easy to overlook, or even to not notice, situations that can cause injury to others less familiar with the surroundings. In this article we will examine the mechanics, environment and client profile that lead to injuries, and we will provide strategies to improve the safety of your office setting. 

 

Read the full story »

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RISK ALERT UPDATE>>

February 2012

 

Risk Alert:  
Physician Assistants Performing EMGs

 

In Summer 2010, we published a Risk Alert reporting on a recent court's decision which concluded that physician assistants are not legally permitted to perform EMG tests, nor are they authorized to assist a duly licensed physician in performing the procedure if the assistance consisted of actually inserting the needle electrode into the muscle (per EMG statute (N.J.U.S.A. 45:9-5.2(a)). The case was appealed and very recently, the supreme court upheld this decision. 
 

Read the original Risk Alert here »

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Risk Management>>

January 2012

 

Psychiatrists & Psychologists:
Failure to Diagnose

 

When is a medical condition masquerading as a behavioral health issue?  Or conversely, how does one discern when mental health symptoms are obscured by a presentation of physical ailments?

 

The challenge is something akin to the question of which came first:  the chicken or the egg? 

 

Read the full story »

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